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This episode is unusual for the very strongly implied homosexual relationship between Fallon (Victor Buono) and Hershey (Gavin MacLeod). Even to suggest such a thing on television was extremely rare in 1965. Submitted by FredK 2 December 2010. + Agreed. dwhite 1.21.13

I saw something similar in a UNTOUCHABLES episode. Philip Pine and Kevin Hagen played two mobsters who seemed a bit more than just brothers in the killing business. It seemed that way after their boss, played by Ricardo Montalban, ordered one to kill the other, fearing he might confess to an acid attack out of weakness. Submitted by MikeReese, 5/30/2016

It's clear that all those responsible were doing their best to make sure that Perry Mason didn't become a cliché of itself, as had The Twilight Zone a year earlier at CBS. These late-season episodes were full of unexpected things not seen usually. That bit with the chimpanzee around Perry's neck in the closing shot is one for the books. Reminiscent of the dog and Paul Drake in the closing shot of TCOT Howling Dog. Raymond Burr loved animals, and he and his partner Robert had a menagerie of their own at their ranch in Healdsburg. dwhite 1.21.13

This episode is different as of late with Perry and Della active with dialogue through the show from the opening shots to the end. Della, known as a good screamer in Hollywood, gets a good scream in. Also, Perry gets somewhat impatient several times with Della, Hershey. You do not hear Perry raise his voice like he did on this show. Perry Baby 11/23/13
+It seemed that Mr. Hershey got impatient and lost his temper with Perry. He slammed his hands on the desk because Mr. Mason insisted on seeing Mr. Addicks. Added by H. Mason 5/2/15
+ It's actually Mr. Fallon that's the initial recipient of impatience, w/ Perry raising both his voice and his (considerable) heft against him - though of course Buono could go buckle-to-buckle against Burr - and adding an exclamatory desk slam to boot. Submitted by Notcom, 052616.

After some stories where people were calling Mr. Mason directly at home (175 and 197) Josephine Kempton went through the night operator to talk to Perry. Submitted by H. Mason 5/2/15

Question: Did Fallon give the police the identity of the impostor? Submitted by H. Mason 5/2/15

Where are Gilligan and the Skipper? The mere fact that this episode includes a guy running around in a gorilla suit--and, worse still, that the guy in the gorilla suit is not Bob Burns-- makes it one of the worst episodes in the show's nine-year run. Submitted by BobH, 16 November 2016.

The gorilla scene ("do not stare at him") seemed a but absurd to me. Submitted by Perry Baby 12/28/16

In the original novel, the author of the threatening letters is the dead man's first wife, not his brother. Moreover, the novel ends with the killer attacking Perry in a gorilla suit with a razor and being shot dead by Paul Drake, an ending possibly lifted from CHARLIE CHAN AT THE CIRCUS and hence unusable for the TV production. Submitted by Red Chief on 17/4/2017.