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CARS: No cars. From The Cars by Greg Cockerill.

Erle Stanley Gardner published his novel The Case of The Empty Tin in 1941. This episode has the same name, but little else in common with that novel. In the novel, Perry never enters the courtroom. Submitted by PaulDrake 33, 27 May 2009.

In Erle Stanley Gardner’s 1941 novel, The Case of the Empty Tin, the character of Arthur Tragg makes his first appearance. Submitted by PaulDrake 33, 27 May 2009.

Frank Wilcox plays the judge in this episode, his fifth of seven appearances as a judge in the prolific first season of the series. He gets to show a bit more of a human side than most actors did in that role. First, he shows considerable amusement at Mason and Burger’s wrangling over the meaning of the word “pretender.” Later Wilcox delivers what is (in my opinion) the best line given to a judge in 271 episodes. As Mason starts to dismantle the empty tin, Burger begins to splutter in protest. Wilcox says: “If Mr. Mason's going to crawl out on a limb, the least we can do is let him saw it off.” Submitted by FredK 17, Oct 2010.

Hallmark Movie Channel starts the week with this episode, #25, following Sunday's marathon of episodes 1-24. But FIOS has continued to list show info sequentially from last Friday's episode #217, and yesterday's two dozen marathon episodes, which were also mislabeled. FIOS thinks today's first show is #242. Submitted by MikeM, 10/9/2012.

The newspaper ad mentioned adventures in China from 1931-56 & Elston Carr said "we trafficked in arms, ammunition and information": China went through a Japanese occupation, civil war & Communist takeover in those 25 years. Mike Bedard 4.23.15

"Soon after he was born, the family moved to China and lived there for five years": nytimes.com/1993/09/14/obituaries/raymond-burr-actor-76-dies-played-perry-mason. Mike Bedard 4.23.15

Spoiler Warning! Do Not Read Below If You Have Not Seen The Episode

For the fourth time in the first twenty-five episodes:

"Heaven has no rage like love to hatred turned
Nor hell a fury like a woman scorned."

Submitted by 65tosspowertrap, 4-10-2014.

How did Rebecca get Della's phone number? The only reason for Rebecca to call Perry (through Della) was so she could get his private number, then make the mistake of calling it while pretending to be Miriam. This would have been a great mystery if it hadn't been established in at least three previous stories that Perry could be called after hours using the night number at the Paul Drake Detective Agency. Submitted by H. Mason 10/6/14
+In her call to Perry, Della stated that Rebecca called "the service" (answering service, I presume) asking for Perry's private number; the service called Della and Della called Perry for authorization. jfh 12May2017.

A glimpse of the elegant Ms Street in her elegant boudouir wearing her elegant dressing gown.

Olive Deering definitely wins this episode's Virginia Fields Scenery-Chewing award! Ed Zoerner, 5/17/17