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CommentPages/Show42

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With Elisha Cook in the cast, I wonder if anyone noticed what may have been a nod to Maltese Falcon in the ending of the show, as the camera pans from face to face, eventually ending on Charles Hays (Robert Lieb); while not an exact copy of the famous scene, anyone who’s seen Maltese will remember “Wilmer’s” befuddlement and then, horror, as the rest of the players have decided he’ll be the fall guy, and the looks on their faces. Brrr! Of course, Leib just looks crestfallen, but still.. Submitted (and corrected) by MikeReese, 7/16/2012.

About 50 seconds into this episode is a street scene with Hotel Royal and Victory Clothing. The same scene, with the same cars, is also in the 1948 movie The Street with No Name (at about 77 minutes into the movie). The movie has a slightly different view. Maybe the episode uses an outtake from the movie? (And maybe there are better uses of one’s time, like studying law and becoming a high-powered lawyer?) Submitted by masonite, 12/03/2011.

Two bank employees are willing to die to save the bank money -- they must have been well paid! One robber mentions "Pop" and "Crowley," an oddly inept thing to do by an experienced robber (or even inexperienced!) cgraul 3.28.12

How fortunate for Perry that the Hargrove Finance Company for some reason failed to fix its incredibly loud and annoying air conditioner in the weeks or months since the robbery. Submitted by 65tosspowertrap, 4 May 2014.

Eleanor Audley's depiction of 'Lois Gilbert' brought to mind a line from Robert Van Gulik's Judge Dee stories: a witness gives a graphic and highly suspect account of what he saw; Judge Dee later says to his assistants that he was the kind of witness who had no eyes but a fanciful imagination. Submitted by MikeReese, 8/16/2014.

Must we assume Nicky or the police returned the coat and got a refund since Lt. Tragg said all of the money was recovered. It would have been nice to have a line of dialog mention that. Submitted by H. Mason 10/13/14