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This episode is included in the Perry Mason 50th Anniversary DVD set. In Barbara Hale's introduction, she notes that it's based on Erle Stanley Gardner's novel The Case of the Counterfeit Eye, but a glass eye was considered to be too gruesome for TV. Hence the change to a toupee. Submitted by raja99
+ The episode also eliminates the novel's additional embezzlement subplot and reduces the number of murder victims from two to one. In other respects, the teleplay closely tracks the source novel's plotline. Submitted by BobH, 18 October 2016.

+Also included in the 50th Anniversary DVD are screen tests of both Raymond Burr and William Hopper playing Perry Mason in a scene taken from the novel The Case of the Counterfeit Eye. We actually see the box of glass eyes. Of course this scene didn't make it into the TV episode "The Case of the Treacherous Toupee." Submitted by Wiseguy70005, 5/07/14.
+ESG: The Case of the Counterfeit Eye was the 6th Perry Mason novel. Published in 1935, it was the first book to feature Hamilton Burger. Submitted by catyron, 12/2/2017.

+Jonathon Hole indicates to Perry in this show that his hair is a toupee. I wonder if it is really a toupee? I have seen this actor in quite a few shows, and he always is shown with hair. Submitted by PaulDrake 33.

+Speaking of toupee, isn't it strange that if someone grabs a toupee with one hand as what it appears the deceased man actually did, wouldn't the whole toupee have been found in his hand when the body was found ? The defendant is actually seen doing this in a later scene while standing in front of a mirror. Submitted by HamBurger 8/16/2014

Note the prominence of the LAX airport and Pan Am in this episode, especially the jet plane. I believe this was something of a plug for both. Jet service, IIRC, was inaugurated from LAX about this time (1959). Submitted by billp. 1 November 2009.

I thought Robert Redford’s performance here was not quite up to what he was capable of in later years. It seems a bit childish, though perhaps that is intentional. On the other hand, Ray Collins delivers a more animated performance than usual. Submitted by gracep 10/13/2010.

+ There were a few criticisms of Redford's early TV work: according to Marc Scott Zicree, author of The Twilight Zone Companion about Redford's appearance, he "performs with all the emotion of a male mannequin-which he strongly resembles. Ironically, one of the lines he delivers, in a leaden monotone, is, 'Am I really so bad?'" Submitted by Wiseguy70005, 8/25/12.

Paul Drake's T-Bird: Does it seem strange that when Paul Drake is dropping off the Robert Redford character at the airport that his tires are squealing making the turn ? It did not seem like he was going that fast. Perhaps his tires need air.... ;-) Submitted by HamBurger 8/16/2014

One of my fave Perry lines ever in the final scene: "Oh, hello Lieutenant... we weren't speaking of the devil, but please come in." MFrench 11/19/16

Spoiler Warning! Do Not Read Below If You Have Not Seen The Episode

If the murderer was trying to get away from the court as fast as possible to the airport, why did he stop to chat with another witness and offer to buy him a cup of coffee? Submitted by Wiseguy70005, 8/25/12.

I thoroughly enjoyed this show, both the first time I saw it and in repeats, but I had to shelve my incredulity at the role of Hartley Basset. A man disappears for two years and just expects to take up where he left off? Even for that time period, I couldn't completely accept it. With business and wife? Really? I can be gone for two hours and my wife wants to know where I am .. and she's the one who sent me out! It would have been a surprise if Basset wasn't'+ the murder victim! Submitted by MikeReese, 10/18/2013.

Frank Wilcox, George E. Stone and Raymond Burr would appear in the same roles a year later on the Jack Benny Show, when Jack dreams that he is put on trial for murdering a rooster, and Perry Mason is defending him. Mason is noticeably inept in that episode. Submitted by vgy7ujm, 11/16/2014.