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EpisodePages/Show232

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<< Lover's Gamble | Episodes | Sad Sicilian >>

#232: The Case of the
Fatal Fetish
Original Airdate: 03/04/65

Summary Edit

From The Perry Mason TV Show Book (Revised)
Fay Wray plays Mignon Germaine, a voodoo dancer whose son Larry (played by actor/talk-show host Gary Collins) is no less than the assistant of Hamilton Burger.

Larry is handling a case of criminal fraud against Allied Chemical, a charge he’d like to drop. But then the firm’s lawyer claims that Larry compromised himself by having his girlfriend, Carina Wileen, broker a deal on the fraud case in exchange for a partnership in the law firm representing Allied. Hamilton has no choice; he suspends Larry.

Larry’s voodoo-dancer mother will do anything to help him. During a performance, Mignon approaches Carina's table and pins a voodoo doll to the table with a ceremonial dagger. Carina immediately falls into a coma. Is it black magic or something more mundane but no less malevolent? Larry doesn’t help his résumé any when he is later found in Carina’s hospital room, standing over her body, which has the ceremonial dagger protruding from it.

Credits Edit

Random actor from episode. Click for page of all available.

Opening

Starring Raymond Burr
in The Case of THE FATAL FETISH
Based upon characters created by Erle Stanley Gardner
Barbara Hale, William Hopper, William Talman, Ray Collins

Trailing

Directed by Charles R. Rondeau
Written by Samuel Newman
Arthur Marks \ Art Seid | Producers
Gail Patrick Jackson | Executive Producer
Jackson Gillis | Associate Producer
Samuel Newman | Story Consultant

Raymond Burr as Perry Mason
Barbara Hale as Della Street
William Hopper as Paul Drake
William Talman as Hamilton Burger
Ray Collins as Lt. Tragg
Wesley Lau as Lt. Anderson

Music Composed by Richard Shores
Music Supervision by Herschel Burke Gilbert

Cast

Fay Wray as Mignon Germaine
Karen Steele as Carina Wileen
Alan Hewitt as Curt Ordway
Gary Collins as Larry Germaine
Lynn Bari as Ruth Duncan
Douglas Kennedy as Brady Duncan
Erin Leigh as Agnes Fanchon
Richard Devon as Neil Howard
James Griffith as Jack Randall
John Gallaudet as Judge Penner
William Keene as Mr. Kenneth
Robert Chadwick as Policeman
Douglas Evans as Magistrate
Breena Howard as Nurse
Wilda Taylor as Choreographer and Dancer
Johnny Francis as Master of Ceremonies

Crew

Director of Photography … John M. Nickolaus, Jr.
Art Direction … Lewis Creber
Assistant Director … Robert G. Stone
Film Editor … Richard H. Cahoon, A.C.E.
Casting … Harvey Clermont
Makeup … Irving Pringle
Hair Stylist … Annabell
Wardrobe Supervision … Ed McDermott, Evelyn Carruth
Set Decoration … Carl Biddiscombe
Properties … Ray Thompson
Production Sound Mixer … Herman Lewis
Script Supervision … Marshall Schlom
Theme Composed by … Fred Steiner
Automobiles Supplied by … Ford Motor Company

Perry Mason
Produced by the CBS Television Network in association with Paisano Productions

Trivia Edit

Fay Wray was, of course, the damsel in distress in the original King Kong (1933). She was blonde then, but now appears to be a brunette. Submitted by gracenote, 4/25/2011.

Mingon Germaine (Wray) brings coffee to a hung-over Carina Wileen (Steele) in a cup and saucer from the Curious Coffee Set. Submitted by gracenote, 4/25/2011.

Douglas Kennedy, a longtime friend of Burr's, was one of the most powerful of the myriad character actors to appear in Perry Mason - especially with his memorable performances in TCOT Moth-Eaten Mink from early in Season 1, and in TCOT Lucky Loser, from Season 2. Nice to see him here, after several years had elapsed. Submitted by dwhite 1.18.13

Sightings: At the Club Caribe, Distinguished Gentleman #1 is rapt with attention at Mignon’s second performance as the drums stop and everyone wonders what happens next. Later, he turns up on the prosecutor’s side of the courtroom gallery, along with Quiet Old Man #1. Meanwhile, Pencil Mustache Man is on the defendant’s side. Read more about these and other frequent faces, and help us spot them. Submitted by gracenote, 4/25/2011.

Uncredited Actors: Don Anderson makes another appearance—this time as a customer at Club Caribe for the first performance by Mignon. Submitted by gracenote, 8/17/2011.

I have noticed a young brunette (dark hair) in this episode that was in the club (was on left side at bar) and then looks like she was again in the courtroom behind in back row on defendant side and then back again at the club at the bar during the epilogue. PerryBaby 10/23/13

Comments Edit

What happened to Perry? His arm is in a sling beneath his suit jacket. Submitted by Francis, 10 June 2011.
+ In a scene at the Club Caribe, Mignon mentions Perry’s accident (but no details are revealed). Submitted by gracenote, 8/17/2011. +Paul also mentions it in Perry's office: "How's the arm?" cgraul 12.19.12 + this episode was probably filmed in early 1965. Raymond Burr had taken a fall outside his studio 'cottage' in January. Submitted by dwhite 1.18.13
+ I'm surprised no one is claiming he injured it "while visiting the troops in Vietnam." 65tosspowertrap, 1-18-2014.

The epilogue here is almost all Paul explaining away the solution to the mystery. He has to talk a mile a minute to fit it all in--and I'm still not sure it makes perfect sense! I do like the atmosphere of the Club Carib, though! Ed Zoerner, 7/7/12 +No, not Paul, Hamilton does the explanation. Paul interjects one comment. cgraul 12.19.12 + As much as I love to see Burger in on the final scene (there are precious few episodes where he is - most memorably TCOT Lame Canary), this is one of the weakest of the epilogues. No one else at the club seems bothered by the fact that they talk loudly while the floor-show is on! dwhite 1.18.13

Raymond Burr is already displaying his tendency to weight which came to total fruition in his wheelchair show, "Ironside." cgraul 12.19.12

When Larry is shown in the hospital, there is a strong low-light effect, as if a flashlight was held below his face. As the wall sconces are 6 foot or so high, there is no logical source for this light, and is only a poor effect intended to introduce premonition suspense. cgraul 12.19.12

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