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<< Wrongful Writ | Episodes | Laughing Lady >>

#241: The Case of the
Mischievous Doll
Original Airdate: 05/13/65

Summary Edit

From The Perry Mason TV Show Book (Revised)
Perry is approached by a young woman named Dorrie Ambler who wants him to verify her identity. A seedy private eye has been paying her to frequent certain places around town and Dorrie thinks it’s because she resembles someone else. Paul learns that this is true: Dorrie looks like a spoiled heiress named Minerva Minden. After some checking, Perry discovers that Minerva was supposedly involved in a hit-and-run accident, and it looks as though Dorrie is being used to prove that. But why?

Blackmail. At least that’s what it looks like. But when the blackmailing private eye is killed, Perry learns the truth. Dorrie Ambler is Minerva Minden. She wasn’t hired by the dead man, she was being blackmailed by him. The question is: Who is the dead woman burned beyond recognition in the car accident but identified as Dorrie Ambler?

Credits Edit

Random actor from episode. Click for page of all available.

Opening

Starring Raymond Burr
in Erle Stanly Gardner’s The Case of THE MISCHIEVOUS DOLL
Barbara Hale, William Hopper, William Talman, Ray Collins

Trailing

Directed by Jesse Hibbs
Teleplay by Jackson Gillis
Arthur Marks \ Art Seid | Producers
Gail Patrick Jackson | Executive Producer
Jackson Gillis | Associate Producer
Samuel Newman | Story Consultant

Raymond Burr as Perry Mason
Barbara Hale as Della Street
William Hopper as Paul Drake
William Talman as Hamilton Burger
Ray Collins as Lt. Tragg
Wesley Lau as Lt. Anderson

Music Composed by Richard Shores
Music Conducted by Herschel Burke Gilbert

Cast

Ben Cooper as Jasper

Mary Mitchel { as Dorrie Ambler
as Minerva Minden
Allyson Ames as Rita Jasper
Marge Redmond as Henrietta Hull
Paul Lambert as Del Compton
Phil Arthur as Joe Billings
Kenneth MacDonald as Second Judge
Charles Martin as Judge
Stanley Clements as Second Taxi Driver
Byron Foulger as Airport Clerk
William Boyett as Police Sergeant
Lee Miller as Sgt. Brice
Holly Harris as Woman Bystander
Alan Fordney as Man Bystander
Philip Harron as First Taxi Driver
Jack Fife as Man at Airport
Ann Staunton as Woman at Airport

Uncredited Actors
Don Anderson as Airport Bystander and as Courtroom Spectator
Robert Wegner as Police Officer

Crew

Director of Photography … John M. Nickolaus, Jr.
Art Direction … Lewis Creber
Assistant Director … Gordon A. Webb
Film Editor … Richard W. Farrell
Casting … Harvey Clermont
Makeup … Irving Pringle
Hair Stylist … Annabell
Wardrobe Supervision … Ed McDermott, Evelyn Carruth
Set Decoration … Carl Biddiscombe
Properties … Ray Thompson
Production Sound Mixer … Herman Lewis
Script Supervision … Marshall Schlom
Theme Composed by … Fred Steiner
Automobiles Supplied by … Ford Motor Company

Perry Mason
Produced by the CBS Television Network in association with Paisano Productions

Trivia Edit

Ray Collins, Adieu (Pt. 1): This is the final episode of season 8. It also marks the final appearance of Ray Bidwell Collins as Lt. Arthur Tragg. Sadly, Mr. Collins would die during the summer of 1965 from emphysema. This episode also marks the final appearance of Wesley Lau as Lt. Andy Anderson. Submitted by PaulDrake 33, 8 August 2009.
+ Oh, the curse of ever-expanding commercial breaks! In a well-used syndication print, Ray Collins does not appear in this episode. So for many viewers, alas, this is but the last of several episodes in which he merely received billing. (See below.) Submitted by gracenote, 5/9/2011; updated 6/10/2011.

+ FredK may be right that the man was intended to be a stunt double. In any case, it clearly is someone other than Tragg who gets out of the car. Submitted by gracenote, 2/12/12.

+ In resolution of the above disagreement: Ray Collins does not appear in Ep 241 TCOT Mischievous Doll. The scene described above with Tragg at the desk advising Anderson to "make Perry Mason your chief suspect" does indeed appear in Ep 196 TCOT Capering Camera from Season 7. This was, on 16 January 1964, Ray Collins' final appearance on screen. He was, however, included in the credits throughout the rest of Season 7 and all of Season 8. He died, as mentioned above, on 11 July 1965, during the summer hiatus between seasons 8 and 9 of the show.
dwhite 1.22.13

Uncredited Actors: Don Anderson makes two appearances in this episode. First, he’s part of a couple who observe Dorrie/Minerva shooting a pistol at the airport. Later he’s a spectator in the courtroom gallery on Burger’s side. Submitted by FredK, 21 April 2011.
+ The scowling cop standing by a car as Perry and Lt. Anderson talk is Robert Wegner, to whom this wiki has a page dedicated. Submitted by gracenote, 5/6/2011.

Location: The Courtyard apartment complex plays double duty by appearing again in “TCOT Dodging Domino.” Submitted by Eric Cooper, 28 April 2011.

Character Names: We learn from Burger that Jasper’s first name, omitted from the credits, is Clyde. Submitted by gracenote, 5/6/2011.

Sightings: Among the horrified bystanders at the airport is Distinguished Gentleman #1, who confers with Don Anderson (see Uncredited Actors, above) among other fellow witnesses (behind Paul Drake). Having recovered from his shock, the Gentleman proceeds to play the court reporter during the evidentiary hearing, while a Pencil Mustache Man observes from an aisle seat behind Perry. Little Old Lady #1 and Quiet Old Man #1 also turn up—the latter magically teleporting between a seat behind the defendant and a seat behind Burger. Submitted by gracenote, 5/6/2011.
+ To find out who these people are, see the page appropriately called Who Is That?

This the first of two PM episodes for Mary Mitchel, who appeared as character Evelyn Boothby in two episodes of "Leave It To Beaver"...MikeM. 3/3/2017

Comments Edit

Season 8 concluded with two episodes featuring very questionable crime-scene work (aside from the also very questionable intelligence of Perry's clients.) In Wrongful Writ, the DA's office failed to establish where, exactly, the crime took place before the preliminary hearing began. And now, for Mischievous Doll, Lt. Anderson and colleagues misidentified a body "burned almost beyond recognition" by using only a partial fingerprint and hair color. Why couldn't they use dental records? No one even mentioned them. One consolation (besides Sgt. Brice getting a closeup and several lines to speak) could be that at least Perry's last client was willing and easily able to pay his fees. Submitted by (lowercase, with a comma and period) masonite, 07/03/13.

This is the last episode of the TV series to be based on an ESG novel (and not a remake). Between 1963 and 1965, ESG published 7 Perry Mason novels that never were adapted for the show. I don't think it was a mandatory time lapse between the book and the adaptation. Look at Deadly Toy, published and filmed in 1959. So why didn't these 7 make it to the small screen? Musings by Bill-W2XOY on 08/01/2013..

More musings. Why did Wesley Lau leave after Season 8? Did he want more money? Did he want opening credits after the death of Ray Collins? I've never seen an answer to this. Submitted by Bill-W2XOY on 08/02/2013..
+Wesley may have left to play Master Sergeant Jiggs on "Time Tunnel"'s lone 1966-67 season. He was in 5 of its 30 episodes: 4 airing in '66 & 1 in '67. Mike Bedard 2.5.15.

Ben Cooper's accent in this episode isn't bad; it's dreadful. Submitted by Dan K, 5/28/16.

Did Lee Harvey Oswald read this ESG novel in December 1962 in the Saturday Evening Post, or in February 1963 when William Morrow and Company published it in book form? The word "patsy" appears eight times in the novel and "fall guy" appears three times. LHO famously said after his arrest that he was just a "patsy." Volumes have been written about how there may have been two or more "Oswald"s. LHO needed an attorney like PM to solve this circumstantial case. Unfortunately, Jack Ruby ended any possibility of a trial. Jack Ruby got flamboyant attorney Melvin Belli to help with his case. He was convicted, but the conviction was thrown out and a new trial ordered at a different venue. Ruby died "unconvicted" before the new trial could take place. In the PM television movies series, PM defends a man accused of killing another on live television...MikeM. 3/3/2017

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