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EpisodePages/Show79

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#79: The Case of the
Lucky Legs
Original Airdate: 12/19/59

Summary Edit

From The Perry Mason TV Show Book
The story begins at a fifties-style beauty contest with a lineup of legs. Marjorie Cluny wins the contest, sponsored by Frank Patton of Stellar Productions. Her prize is a trip to Hollywood and a role in Patton's next picture. But alas, there was "fine print" in Marjorie's contract, and her "career" in Hollywood lasts all of two days. When Patton is found punctured with a woodcarving instrument, Marjorie disappears and becomes the leading suspect. Perry must find out which one of Marjorie's lovers is the real culprit, and clear the "Lucky Legs" winner of the murder charge.

Credits Edit

Random actor from episode. Click for page of all available.

Opening

Starring Raymond Burr
in Erle Stanley Gardner’s The Case of THE LUCKY LEGS

Trailing

Directed by Roger Kay
Teleplay by Maurice Zimm
Herbert Hirschman | Producer
Gail Patrick Jackson | Executive Producer
Produced by The CBS Television Network in association with Paisano Productions
Seeleg Lester | Associate Producer, Story Consultant
Arthur Marks | Associate Producer

Cast

John Archer as J. R. Bradbury
Lisabeth Hush as Marjorie Cluny
Jeanne Cooper as Thelma Hill
Michael Miller as Bob Doray
Doreen Lang as Mrs. Fields
Douglas Evans as Frank Patton
John Launer as Judge
Pitt Herbert as Dr. James Latham
Ray Kellogg as George Sanborne
Sid Tomack as Night Clerk
Rennie McEvoy as Emcee
Leo Needham as Policeman
Arthur Marshall as Art Store Clerk
Pat Moran as Court Clerk
Cast credits as seen in episode. See trivia for anomalies.

Uncredited Actors
Lee Miller as Sgt. Brice (added by gracep 9/17/2010)
Robert Wegner as Courtroom Spectator (added by gracep 9/26/2010)

Crew

Art Seid, A.C.E. | Assistant to the Producer

Production Supervisor … Dewey Starkey
Director of Photography … Frank Redman, A.S.C.
Art Direction … Lewis Creber
Film Editor … John D. Faure
Assistant Director … Morris Harmell
Casting … Harvey Clermont
Makeup … Irving Pringle
Hair Stylist … Annabell, S.C.H.
Wardrobe Supervision … William Zacha, Evelyn Carruth
Set Decoration … Charles Q. Vassar
Sound Effects Editor … Gene Eliot, M.P.S.E.
Music Editor … Gene Feldman
Properties … Ray Thompson
Production Sound Mixer … Herman Lewis
Script Supervision … Robert Gary

Trivia Edit

Anomaly: Jeanne Cooper, listed as Thelma Hill, is really Thelma Bell.
Doreen Lang, listed as Mrs. Fields, is really Miss (Laura) Fields.

Goof: The door in the jail scene, opened and closed by the matron, has no lock! Submitted by daveb, August 13, 2007.

The role of Dr. James Latham here is played by Pitt Herbert. Pitt Herbert played the autopsy surgeon, coroner, etc., 16 times on Perry. However he was only given a name twice, here and in episode #179, TCOT Skeleton’s Closet, where he was named Dr. Desmond. Submitted by PaulDrake 33, 9 October 2009.

Normally Mr. Launer is listed in the credits as S. John Launer, but for some reason in this episode the “S.” is omitted. The initial is also omitted in #70, TCOT Spurious Sister. Submitted by gracep, 9/17/2010.

Sightings: As Tragg is testifying, the camera cuts to Perry Mason and his client. Behind them we see a Little Old Lady in a Hat in the gallery. When the hearing reconvenes, a Pencil-Mustached Man sits on the prosecutor’s side, second row. When Burger calls Darby, the Man turns his head; he often does things like that to call attention to himself. (Later, he disappears and his seat is empty). A Quiet Old Man keenly watches from the back row the turn of events. And the Lady moves to prosecutor’s side and sits next to the ubiquitous Distinguished Gentleman #1. Read more about these and other recurring courtroom spectators here in this wiki. Submitted by gracep, 9/17/2010.

Location: About 7 minutes in we see a quick exterior shot of what I believe is Park La Brea Tower Apartments before we go Perry and Della on a studio set of the Holliday Arms. Also see 2 episodes later #81, TCOT Frantic Flyer, where at 17:45 into the episode the Park La Brea Towers double as the Highland Apts. Submitted by Eric Cooper, 5 February 11.
+ The building was also seen in episode 51. That building was used in an establishing shot as the Bromley Towers in New York in the 1957 Bowery Boys movie Spook Chasers. Submitted by H. Mason 12/11/14

Only ONE CAR: Della departs the Holliday Arms in a yellow taxi, 1959 Ford Custom 300 Fordor Sedan, Lic No PYH 030. "Custom 300" was Ford's most basic model in '59. You saw this same car during daylight in Ep#70, when the door lettering was readable: "RATES - 25˘ First 1/5 Mile -Each Additional 1/5 Mile". A loaf of bread was 20˘. Added by Gary Woloski, 7/23/12.

Anomaly: At 17:02, Perry and Della get into an "elevator." But there is no gap between the hotel floor and the "elevator" floor, and the carpet line connects the hotel floor with the floor of the "elevator" (which must be a little room behind the pocket doors). The same is true at 17:40, when they exit the "elevator," and the pocket doors don't even touch the floor. Submitted by 10yearoldfan, 31 July 2012.

Photography: At 47:50 we are treated to quite an unusual and fearsome closeup shot of Perry's face. Submitted by 10yearoldfan, 31 July 2012.

Movie: This story was made into a movie released in 1935 with Warren Williams as Perry Mason and Genevieve Tobin as a blonde Della Street. It is available on DVD. Submitted by H. Mason 10/18/14.
+ For whatever reason, the setting of the movie was moved from LA to San Francisco, which - of course - actually has a town named Cloverdale to its north (though the movie version seems larger and quite fictionalized). Any possibility of confusion is avoided here, as the town is specified as being in Utah. Submitted by Notcom, 101415.

Same street: Paul mentioned Bob Doray sold woodcarvings to an art shop on Olvera Street. In episode 12 TCOT Negligent Nymph the Las Chalupas Restaurant was on the same street. Submitted by H. Mason 10/26/14

Fake Della: For the second time a woman made a phone call and said she was Della Street. It also happened in episode 68 TCOT Dubious Bridegroom. Submitted by H. Mason 10/26/14

Raymond won the 1959 Emmy for Best Actor in a Leading Role, Continuing Character, in a Dramatic Series [IMDb Awards]. Mike Bedard 3.8.15.

Say that again This episode will be the first of 20 consecutive alliterative titles, the most the series will have (for those wondering about TCOT Crying Cherub, my dictionary defines alliteration as the same sound or same letter) Submitted by Notcom, 101415.

This is the first of three PM appearances for Lisabeth Hush. She was married to actor Sam Gilman, who appeared in TCOT One-Eyed Witness in 1958..MikeM. 10/26/2016
+IMHO Lisabeth Hush bears a remarkable resemblance to Glenn Close. jfh 02Jan2017

Comments Edit

Anomaly: I have not seen anyone comment yet that the "Brent Building," seen in establishing shots just prior to Perry's office door, could not possibly be Perry's building: the Brent Building has vertical exterior framing, but Perry's office has a horizontal balcony that connects to the next office. Submitted by 10yearoldfan, 31 July 2012.

I recently re-read TCOT Lucky Legs. Although it is the third book in the series, copyright 1934, my paperback also has a 1931 copyright. Some have speculated it may have actually been the first PM book ESG wrote. Perry sends Della out of his office when he interviews clients. He keeps critical information from her. His relationship with Paul is more businesslike. In fact, at one point, unbeknownst to Paul, Perry hires another Detective Agency to do supplemental work. Perry and JR Bradbury go to a speakeasy, complete with squinty eyes behind a sliding panel. Prohibition was repealed in 1933, so this supports the 1931 theory. In the book, JR Bradbury is a very smart, powerful man. And, for the later paperback versions of the book, ESG wrote an introduction, inviting the reader to compare the contemporary Perry to this earlier version. Well worth a read. Submitted by Bill-W2XOY on 08/27/13.

Knock on Wood. Since this episode touches on the craft of woodcutting, it should be noted that the largest piece of woodcutting to appear is Bob Doray himself, at least as portrayed by actor Michael Miller. Miller displays anger by clenching his fists and scowling, and displays other emotions--much less frequently--by unclenching his fists and scowling. Submitted by BobH, 30 September 2016.

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