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Here is Karl Held’s initial appearance as David Gideon. He would go on to appear as David Gideon 8 more times in the 1961-62 season. He had appeared 3 months earlier in an episode playing a different character. Submitted by PaulDrake 33, 15 January 2010.
+ Perhaps the "David Gideon" character was intended to appeal to the female audience. Submitted by DellaFan, 10/5/2013.

Dub Taylor makes his only Perry appearance here as a witness noted only as “Stroller.” Dub Taylor was an old time cowboy star using the name “Cannonball Taylor.”He appeared in over fifty B-Westerns as the sidekick of Wild Bill Elliott, The Durango Kid, Red Berry, and Jimmy Wakley. Often Kenneth MacDonald, who plays the judge in this episode would also have a part as the villian in his Westerns. Dub Taylor, though, is probably best known as Ivan Moss, the man who set up Bonnie and Clyde for their ambush in the 1967 movie of the same name. Submitted by PaulDrake 33, 15 January 2010

Character Names: John Gallaudet is listed in the credits as “Superior Court Judge,” even though the door to his courtroom is clearly labeled Judge Thomas J. Hood. Submitted by PaulDrake 33, 15 January 2010.

Whose courtroom, actually, is it? At about 18:07 (on the 2009 Paramount DVD) Kenneth MacDonald is using Hood’s courtroom. Then, at about 33:26, John Gallaudet is using it. Submitted by masonite. 12 March 2010.
+ Kenneth MacDonald and his scene described above do not appear in the syndication print. Also, Ray Collins is listed in the credits but does not appear. Someone else needs to verify if this is only in the syndication print or if he has a scene in the DVD. Submitted by gracep, 11/18/2010.
++ I didn't see him in the episode, only listed in the credits at the beginning and end. At about 22:17 (on the 2009 Paramount DVD) a Sheriff’s car drops David Gideon off at the scene of the crime, and later Sgt. Brice is at the same scene. Submitted by masonite, 21 November 2010.
+++ On the Paramount DVD, the first courtroom scene runs from about 20:15 to 22:55 with MacDonald as the judge. The second courtroom scene starts at about 34:50. It’s the same courtroom as the first scene. Such cutting is not unusual in broadcast episodes. Submitted by daveb, 11/21/2010.

Judges, Courtrooms and Credits: Apparently the name on the door may be the main judge who uses the courtroom but other judges also use it. The name of "Thomas J. Hood" was also seen on the door in the second season episode "The Glittering Goldfish" and the third season's "The Golden Fraud" (in a different shots and perhaps in other episodes) but the judge in those episodes was played by S. John Launer so an exact identification of which actor played Thomas J. Hood (if any) may be impossible. Also although it is obviously the same set used twice in this episode it may be different courtrooms built identically in the same building. As far as the credits go, actors' names are credited not as a public service but due to legalities: if the actor's contract specifies he will be credited regardless of an appearance he will be credited. This is why Ray Collins gets a credit. On the other hand, character credits are given for informational purposes. If the judge had been credited as "Thomas J. Hood" viewers may not know which judge was being referred to (and, as mentioned above, he may not BE Thomas J. Hood). The credit of "Superior Court Judge" immediately informs the viewer which judge the actor played in the brief time the credit appears. Submitted by Wiseguy70005, 11/03/14.

Sightings: “Miss Carmody” is a smiling but silent hostess at a restaurant. She reappears in the courtroom gallery during the trial, along with Quiet Old Man #1 and Distinguished Gentleman #1, not to mention the Little Old Lady in a Hat, who is very prominent in a cutaway to Miss Franks. Read more about these and other regular faces here. Submitted by gracep, 11/18/2010.
+ Distinguished Gentleman #1 can also be seen driving the cab outside Doreen's place. Or is that Blue Collar Guy wearing glasses? Submitted by daveb, 4/11/2011.

CARS. (1) Dorine Hopkins' circa 1960 Volkswagen Beetle, sunroof closed, Lic No SGL 486,

The car in the garage at 2247 Pine (as David breaks in) is a 1960 Ford Fairlane, medium color, only tail end seen. The external spare tire (Continental Kit) on David's car was Standard Equipment on '56 TBirds. The weight at the rear caused quirky handling so this feature was discontinued for '57 (more about this here). Added by Gary Woloski, 11/25/12.

Cold case / old case: Perry also solved the murder of Lucius Gideon killed 3 months earlier and thought to be a suicide. Submitted by H. Mason 9/27/14

Wrong number: Most fans know Perry's office number is Madison 5-1190. When J.J. Gideon called him from the phone booth the first two numbers he dialed were 7-5 instead of 6-2. Submitted by H. Mason 11/10/14

Judge: Kenneth MacDonald was listed in the credits as "Trial Judge". He was at the preliminary hearing. There is a difference between a hearing and a trial. Submitted by H. Mason 11/10/14

Uncredited Actor: Robert Wegner joins the court as the Balliff. Bill767, 1/6/16.

This episode along with TCOT Devious Delinquent feature both Otto Kruger and Frances Rafferty. HamBurger 8/13/2016

This is the first of six PM directing credits for Bernard Kowalski. All the episodes aired in 1961...MikeM. 9/17/2016

This is the second of four PM appearances for Maura McGiveney, who was born in England in 1939. She was married for less than a year to comedian Bill Dana. McGiveney passed in Los Angeles in 1990...MikeM. 12/26/2016

This is the first of two PM appearances for Frances Rafferty, who was a pin-up girl in YANK magazine during World War II...MikeM. 9/25/2017