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Does anyone else notice how the defendant's hair changes in this episode? It is very short and thin and then all of a sudden when Perry visits her in jail, her hair has become quite voluminous, though still short. There must be some awesome hairdressers in that jail! Welshwoman 10/2014.

William Idelson, better known as Billy Idelson, makes his first of three appearances here on Perry playing the police technician. Way back in the 1930s Billy Idelson was well known for playing Rush on the radio day time serial Vic and Sade. He then quit show business for a brief period before becoming a television writer. He was a prolific writer, penning scripts for among others, Dick Van Dyke, Andy Griffith, Twilight Zone, M*A*S*H, The Odd Couple and The Bob Newhart Show. His best known acting gig was as Herman Glimscher on the Dick Van Dyke Show. Submitted by PaulDrake 33, 19 August 2009.
+ He has 30 Writer/41 Actor IMDb credits; he shared the Writers Guild of America award for best Episodic Comedy Twice ("Get Smart" & "The Andy Griffith Show"). Mike Bedard 7.18.16 MeTV viewing. //

Modelling Practice ? Miss Huntingdon may have spent a similar amount of time in real life posing in swim suits: the 19-year old Mt Shasta native was the 1959 Miss California, going on to win Miss USA as well...an early example of pageant queens cutting their acting teeth on PM. Submitted by Notcom, 101315.

Life Imitates Art? Please take a look at the Wikipedia page for Terry Huntingdon. After making her acting debut with Perry, her later life could have been weaved into several good episodes of PM....MikeM. 7/18/2016

Anomaly: Although just listed in the credits as “Macready,” Herbert Patterson’s character is Sergeant Macready. Submitted by gracep, 9/15/2010.

Sightings: We catch a glimpse or two (but only just) of Little Old Lady in a Hat and the Quiet Old Man (#1) among the courtroom spectators. Read more about them and other regulars here, and maybe help us find more. Submitted by gracep 9/17/2010, updated 2/4/2011.
+“Miss Carmody” is seated next to Simon Atley in the courtroom gallery. Is she portraying “Mrs. Atley”? You decide. Submitted by alan_sings, 3 Oct 2010.
+ On Burger's side we find the Cute Young Lady and in the back row we find Distinguished Lady #4. Submitted by Bill767, 10/31/15.

Location: About 14 minutes in, Paul checks out an Automobile Registration for Kitty Wynne. Often the registration addresses are inside jokes by the writers that list the address of the studio. This address 1226 N. Hayworth is for an apartment building in West Hollywood that I assume had some connection to a writer or actor. Submitted by Eric Cooper, 3 February 2011.
+ And, half-a-minute later, the house numbers to the right of Rick Stassi's front door are seen as Kitty leaves in a hurry. The numbers "226" made me do a double-take, asking "What did I just see?" & "Does Kitty live there?". This spurious source of potential confusion (Rick at 226, Kitty at 1226) should have been edited out! Gary Woloski, 8/11/12.

NFL 252, Addresses and Spelling. This is what Paul saw on Kitty's car registration form:

  • AUTOMOBILE REGISTRATION________HJT ????
  • NAME..Kitty Wynne__________________Code--42
  • ADDR REGISTERED OWNER...1226 No. Hayworth
  • Licence No...NFL 252_______Engine No. XY454377
  • Make...Ford______________Type....Convertable (sic)
  • First Sold...5/9/55____________________Fee $....32
  • First Issued...(unreadable)

This is Season 3's first of four appearances of "Licence No...NFL 252" on a car registration. All four registrations are for Convertible-type cars but the "Type" entry is misspelled "Convertable" on three of them (this ep#77, 83 & 86). In Ep#89 we can't see the "Type" entry. The "Address" entries on all four seem to be mischievously conceived, as they also are on most or all car registrations elsewhere in the series. Submitted by Gary Woloski, 18 Aug 2012.

CARS: (1) 1958 Thunderbird Convertible, Lic No PXY 260, Drake, black, white top up (rain).

Factory Price of the 1959 Mark IV Convertible was $7056. Production was 2,195 cars. 10,491 copies of Tragg's model of the '59 Electra 255 were produced at a Factory Price of $4,300. Yer basic 6-banger Ford or Chevy cost $2273 or $2301. Added by Gary Woloski, 8/11/12.

Verbal Product Placement. Spoken references to cars in Perry Mason are almost always generic: for example "a 1959 convertible with a torn top". In a rare naming of a specific car make or model, Perry asks the Watchman in court if he saw "a 1959 Thunderbird . . . PINK" at the Dunbar lot. We don't see this car on screen but we know that the owner could only be Madge Wainwright/June Vincent or, today, maybe . . . . Other explicit spoken and/or written references to vehicular products are:

  • for Biltmore Trailers in Ep#17 and,
  • MikeM reported that "Ford" was uttered court at least three times during Ep#65.
  • "Rolls-Royce" or "Rolls" was spoken five times in Ep#198.

Submitted by Gary Woloski, 8/20/12, revised 10/29/14.

Goof: On the first day of the trial, Bud Ferrand (played by John Anderson) is wearing a BOW TIE. But, during the rest of trial scenes, and when he testifies, he is seen wearing a regular four-in-hand tie. On the second day of the trial, he is back wearing the bow tie. Obviously, when they edited this episode they mixed up the trial scenes. Via email from Alan Beck, posted by daveb, 7/24/2011.

This episode is unusual in that the witnesses sit on the right side of the judge rather than the left. Often the camera is placed behind the witness showing Perry's reactions to the testimony in full face view rather than three-quarter. Submitted by 10yearoldfan, 20 July 2012

Paul Drake on the witness stand: We saw Paul testify for the second time. The first time was in episode 45 TCOT Buried Clock. Submitted by H. Mason 10/25/14
+ Professional Courtesy/Mutual Respect: DA Burger thanked PI Drake for the accuracy of his/operatives' testimony; the DA was thankful for Not having to treat Paul as a "hostile" witness. Even though they were on Opposite sides of a case, Both men were on the Same side of the Law. Mike Bedard 7.18.16//

Telephone numbers: Rick Stassi's phone number was STate 1-1781. It was the second and final mention of that phone exchange in the series. In episode 17 TCOT Sunbather's Diary STate 9-1499 was a fake number. In episodes 131, 193 and 198 phone book pages are shown with several phone numbers that begin with the letters "ST". Submitted by H. Mason 10/25/14

Perry quotes Judge Learned Hand re fashions. Here's the case:“[A] man’s property is limited by the chattels of his invention,” wrote Judge Learned Hand in an important 1929 case involving dress designs, Cheney Bros. v. Doris Silk. “Others,” he concluded, “may imitate these at their pleasure.”...MikeM. 7/18/2016

This is the first of two PM appearances for John Lupton, who had a headache in a 1965 Anacin commercial...MikeM. 10/24/2016

This is the second of two PM appearances for Stephen Bekassy, who was born in Hungary in 1907 and passed in Hungary in 1995...MikeM. 10/24/2016

This is the only PM writing credit for Jerome Ross, who passed in 2012 at the age of 101...MikeM. 7/24/2017