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The character name “Greasy Neal” must be a play on the name of the famous football coach, Alfred Earle “Greasy” Neale. Submitted by Ed Zoerner, 5/11/2009.

The Summary exaggerates a bit. As Mason points out to Luke Balfour, the sum total of young Tim’s police record is two speeding tickets and one charge of reckless driving. Submitted by gracenote, 2/26/2011.

Dollar Bill: Notice the Silver Certificate bill that Luke offered to Tim. This show was made just about the time the government started to issue the Federal Reserve Note in $1 denominations. Submitted by H. Mason 3/11/15 - revised 4/1/15

Unless I missed something, Della has no lines in this episode! What was that opening bit all about? Did Chick and Greasy rob the store? Did they harm the owner? Why was the character of Greasy even introduced - he only appears again as a courtroom spectator. DODay 12/29/17

Spoiler Warning! Do Not Read Below If You Have Not Seen The Episode

"The Case of the Lucky Loser, Episode 2.0." This episode seems to revive plot elements from Episode #41, "The Case of the Lucky Loser." We are introduced again to a dysfunctional family named Balfour that includes a bed-ridden wealthy old man, his young ne'er-do-well relative and potential heir, and the possibility of the latter's involvement in a "hit-and-run accident" that winds up being a hoax. Submitted by BobH, 15 November 2017.

The conclusion is really frustrating. How in the world did Mason come up with all of Edith’s machinations? How did she alienate all those people? How would anyone, especially Mason figure that out? Too many questions are left unanswered. It feels a little phony. Submitted by gracenote, 2/26/2011.