Show238

Once again we have no Ray Collins (Lt. Tragg) despite being billed. Has he appeared at all this season? Submitted by gracenote, 5/16/2011
+ His last appearance was in The Case of the Capering Camera, when his health had clearly declined. He died about ten weeks after this episode aired. Submitted by vgy7ujm, 29 January 2015.

This is another Case of the less Perry Scene time. Perry is not seen until quite late in the show with the guests doing most of the dialogue. Raymond seems stiff. This episode had a lot of good suspect characters for the last second surprise. There were several extreme close up shots as well and some looked blurry. Perry Baby 11/21/13

Paul's Suite: For some reason, throughout the series, the number of the Paul Drake Detective Agency was never given. In this story Drake's door and the adjacent business had no visible number. Thanks to a comment made by Gertie Lade in episode 31 TCOT Fiery Fingers we found out it was somewhere on the ninth floor. Submitted by H. Mason 5/1/15

When Herbie the ex-pitcher arrives home and angrily winds up and heaves the briefcase by the handle at the wall like an overhand 102-mph fastball, oh man that was perfection. MFrench 11/19/16

This is one of my favorite episodes - the smooth gestures the victim pulls off with the men she interacts with, including her husband, spoke louder than if she'd chewed the scenery. As an example, note the scene where she kisses him a few times .. but rebuffs him when he tries to kiss her. Cold blooded! Submitted by MikeReese, 6/12/2017

Perry describes Millie as a “two-timer”. By my count, she was more of a “three-timer”. DOD 03/30/20

This episode reminded me of the movie "What's Up, Doc?", with at least three lookalike briefcases. I'm still not sure how Charlie ended up with the one that had the money.

This episode has more twists than a pretzel but it seems Herbie accidentally picked up the wrong case, the one with the money, when he visited Lillian's office the first time. She had already taken the money from the safe and left the note. Then at some point that afternoon she gave the case she thought had the money (but was Herbie's sample case), to the young executive in preparation for their trip to San Fran (why she was taking the money on the trip is not clear, did she have a secret bank account there? Maybe she was not planning to return?). And very cavalier of her to leave the case lying around her office with people in and out and then to just give the case to the young exec, who seemingly had nothing to do with the money at all (or was he lying on the stand? Were they running away? Was that why she rented an appartment?). But it is interesting that according to the confession Lillian was not murdered over the money but because Charlie was afraid Lillian when questioned about the money would spill the beans about their affair to the police and Herbie might find out and then kill Charlie. So pre-emptive self-defense? But it was mainly jealousy and injured manhood (she was "no good" for laughing at him and going off to San Fran with another of her lovers). And maybe even anger at how she was treating Herbie, who Charlie liked, and to whom he directed his confession, even if Charlie clearly liked Lillian more! This makes sense to me, but Paul was not buying it and even suggested a different motive in which Charlie was trying to convince Lillian to get the money back before Herbie really did call the police but then killed her (for laughing at him as she told him about her trip with the young exec? Certainly she would have been willing to cooperate with Charlie to get the money back). Seems like the writer had so many ideas he did not want to leave any of them out (or errors? on the stand, Charlie seems to say he and Herbie worked for a printing company). The lack of certainty on so many points makes this one of the better puzzlers and leaves an air of intrigue and mystery even after that music comes up and the credits start to roll. Fred Flintstone 11/27/2020

If the Shoe Fits with two incomes in the family, and a decent apartment, Herbie is hardly down at the heels, but his wife walks all over him: one wonders if the writer's depiction of him as an "arch support salesman" wasn't meant as some kind of inside joke...literally. Notcom, 073119.