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Jerome Cowan is excellent (and humorous) as shady "business manager" Victor Latimore. He is particularly adept at exploiting the comic potential of the scene in which Latimore finds out that "gangster" Lou Caporale is sitting in his outer office and then tries--unsuccessfully, of course--to toss Caporale out. Submitted by BobH, 24 September 2016.

+"Anybody Can Type." Latimore's employment of his comely "secretary" Doris, and Perry's bemused reaction to her, calls to mind the classic scene in Howard Hawks's "Monkey Business" (1952) where Charles Coburn insists that his secretary, Marilyn Monroe, find someone else to type an important letter. Upon her leaving the room, Coburn turns to Cary Grant, shrugs, and says "Anybody can type." Submitted by BobH, 5 June 2018.

The fair Doris slinks in and out of Latimore's office each time we see her. Was that her big moment? Submitted by Clothears 11th Feb 2020.

So, this episode could've been called "The Case of the Suspect's Shoe" since Lurene Tuttle played both the suspect here and the shoplifter (Ep #166 - TCOT Shoplifter's Shoe") 4 years later. Submitted by Arisia 02/23/18
When Surette enters Allen's house, she leaves the door slightly open. When Caporale is lurking outside the door, it is closed.
+ Maybe "the hand" forgot to pull it closed when she entered :-) Kilo 11/11/2019.

Redundant. And repetitive: In the show's closing remark, Aunt Surette says that she is "...so grateful... and thankful." I'm not sure I see the distinction. Submitted by JohnK, 21 January 2019
> If I was to argue this in writer's court, I would say the former referred to Perry personally, while the latter was for the Fates - thankfully that didn't happen is a commonplace expression, whereas gratefully that didn't happen isn't; that having been said, "grateful...and relieved" might have flowed better. Notcom, 012119.

Sign of the times: Joyce gave Allen the decorative ashtray as a gift. I wonder how many are bestowed as gifts today. Submitted by JohnK, 21 January 2019

Hmmm. Blood on the bottom of the deck and patio below but none on the top of the deck? Doesn't seem likely. Kilo 11/11/2019.

+ Tragg told Perry that the porch was "all cleaned up nice" up there. That implies the killer mopped up the blood before it had a chance to seep into the wood. Submitted by Kenmore 9/08/2020
++ The killer came back, got rid of the body, cleaned up the blood and left the heel stuck in the deck floor. Still seems a little iffy to me. Kilo 4/28/2021.

A Hard 30: Sheridan turned 30 the night before his murder. At the time, William Campbell was 36. Submitted by Kenmore 9/08/2020

The $162,000 Sheridan is expecting would be over $1.4 million in 2020 dollars.

Spoiler Warning! Do Not Read Below If You Have Not Seen The Episode!

Questions: What happened to Mr. Curtis? Was he shown leniency or charged as an accessory to the murder? Submitted by H. Mason 10/25/14

Did Lt. Tragg really suggest to Perry that it would be easy for a little old lady to get a dead adult male body from an upstairs balcony and down to a car parked in front of the house...because it was downhill all the way?...MikeM. 7/19/2016
Yes, I found that a little bit of a strange explanation. It would be too complicated and she would risk detection. Also, his apartment seemed to be on the second floor, so presumably someone lived below. --yelocab 26DEC18

After Caporale watches Surette drive off, does he not go back to the house and find the body? Hard to believe he'd just shrug and leave himself. Hard to believe that Joyce and Ralph could have done it either, even working together. DOD 08/05/18

William Campbell plays a similar slimy character in “Ill Fated Faker”, only in that one he does, indeed, get away to Mexico. Banks in Mexico City must be very trusting. Apparently they handed over that money without checking identification. DOD 08/19/19

How did the body get off the deck? Bizyfe0415 8/6/18