Show48

CARS: No cars. From The Cars by Greg Cockerill.
+ There is at least one car driving up the street in an exterior shot about 9 minutes in. jfh 31Oct2018.

Sightings: There is a spectator in the courtroom who appears in several other trials. He is a dark-complected man with a pencil thin mustache who resembles Leo Carrillo. He is wearing Hamilton Burgerís gold tie with black stripes that was described in Episode #22, TCOT Fugitive Nurse. He wore this same tie the year before in the courtroom in Episode #32, TCOT Substitute Face. All during the trial in this episode, he whispers to the woman seated next to him, thereby drawing attention to himself. Submitted by PaulDrake33, date unknown.
+ By now you may wonder, just who is that? Some of his friends join him in the courtroom gallery, too, including Quiet Old Man #1, ďMiss CarmodyĒ, the Little Old Lady in a Hat, and Distinguished Gentleman #1, who is first visible when Burger stands to object to Masonís questions of Mr. Gordon. Submitted by gracep, 1/10/2010. See also continuity note, below.
++ The Pencil Mustache Man is seen eating at the Restaurant in the final scene. The Distinguished Lady #4 attends the last hearing on Perry's side. Submitted by BigBill767, 2/4/17.

Uncredited Actors: Don Anderson repeats one of his familiar roles here as the bailiff seated near the clerk and the reporter. Submitted by FredK 19 Nov 2010.

Continuity: When Burger stands to object to Masonís questions about The Purple Woman, two courtroom spectators, Quiet Old Man #1 and Distinguished Gentleman #1 are sitting on the prosecutorís side of the courtroom. As he sits down, overruled of course, the two spectators have teleported to the defendantís side! As Burger and Mason talk to the judge at the bench, they two are back on the prosecutorís side. Then, when Kovac and Burger stands before the painting, DG #1 is right behind Perry Mason (and QOM #1 has switched sides, too). But when Burger returns to his seat, DG#1 is in the back row of the defense side again! Submitted by gracep, 1/10/2010. + The Pencil Mustache Man described by PaulDrake33 above also moves back and forth in the final courtroom scene. Submitted by gracep, 1/10/2010.

Syndicated cuts: In jail, Evelyn asks Mason how anyone could think she is guilty, Mason replies there are three reasons; scene in Mason's office before Doris leaves; scene with Varner and Mason discussing the forgery; Gordon telling Mason what he knows about Varner; Paul, Perry and Della being served lunch by Martha before Tragg arrives. Submitted by Wiseguy70005, 8/02/12.

Recycled newspaper: The papers Della handed to Perry and Paul in the restaurant came from episode 18 TCOT Cautious Coquette. Submitted by H. Mason 10/14/14

Hotel chain: Doris Andrews and Milo Girard had registered as husband and wife at the Gateview Hotel in Palo Alto. Perry had Claire Olger register as Joan Lewis at the L.A. area Gateview Hotel in episode 19 TCOT Haunted Husband. Submitted by H. Mason 10/14/14

Actor George Macready appeared in another painting-related episode of Perry Mason, "The Case of the Posthumous Painter" in the fifth season (1961), which also dealt with the possibility of faked paintings. Submitted by Wiseguy70005, 2/23/15.

George Macready was one of the great urbane villains of many movies of the 1940s and 1950s, perhaps most famously as Rita Hayworth's husband in "Gilda." Here he does a small-screen version of the same haughty, malicious character, and, naturally, meets a similar fate. Submitted by BobH, 4 January 2016.
+ He was Secretary of State Cordell Hull in the 1970 docudrama "Tora! Tora! Tora!" [IMDb]. Mike Bedard 6.2.16

This is the first of four PM directing credits for Gerd Oswald, who was born in Germany in 1919...MikeM. 9/13/2016

This is the second of three PM appearances for actress/writer Bethel Leslie (Evelyn Girard), whose father was an attorney. Bethel Leslie had her first stage role at age fourteen. She worked steadily the rest of her life until her passing in 1999 at the age of 70...MikeM. 6/25/2018

"What Goya did for the Duchess of Alba:" When Aaron Hubble offers to do for Evelyn Girard what Goya did for the Duchess of Alba, the implication is that he proposes to become her lover and to paint a picture of her naked. The 18th century Spanish painter Goya was thought to have been the lover of MarŪa Cayetana de Silva, 13th Duchess of Alba. In addition to two formal portraits of her (The Black Duchess and the White Duchess, so named from the colour of her clothing in the paintings), and a playful caprice depicting her scandalizing her pious female servant, there are two informal portraits of a reclining woman, The Clothed Maja and the Naked Maja, that have been assumed by popular art historians to be images of her as well. Submitted by catyron, December 21st, 2020.